Friday Favorite

Dance of Eternal Love by Toshi Yoshida

There are so many beautiful paintings and photographs of cranes, but I like this painting in particular because it captures the aptly named dance of eternal love so well.  It reminds me of Van Gogh who was influenced by Japanese art, even though it was painted in 1970, eight decades after Van Gogh’s passing.

Most people close to us know that Jeff and I have a soft spot for cranes, even after folding 1,000 origami ones for our wedding. As symbols of loyalty, honor and longevity we thought they would be the perfect symbol for our marriage and had a pair carved onto our rings. If you haven’t seen them dance it’s worth watching the video below. They actually bow to each other beforehand. Their dance is full of beauty, grace, and tension reminding me of a tango. Though cranes are an idealized symbol for our partnership, I think in reality we behave more like plump little lovebirds, pecking at each other as we bicker and then hugging as we makeup.

How about you? What creature or symbol represents your ideal(s)?

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Technically it’s Saturday here in Guangzhou, but it’s still Friday in America. We had people over I stayed up later than I expected playing board games (definitely worth it). Friday Favorite posts are where I share paintings and drawings I like. To see more Friday Favorites, click here.

Friday Favorite Temporary Hiatus

I’m taking a break from Friday Favorites for another week or so until the semester over. Posts will resume shortly thereafter.

In the meantime, I’d love to hear which artists and paintings are among your favorites.

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Friday Favorite posts are where I share paintings and drawings I like. To see more Friday Favorites, click here.

Friday Favorite

The Spanish Dancer by John Singer Sargent

We’re doing gesture sketches this week and this painting came to mind because Sargent captures the pose and movement of the dancer so well. Though his palette is limited, the effect certainly isn’t. He creates a wonderful variety of textures and makes full use of his palette resulting in colors with a rich and earthy vibrancy.

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Friday Favorite posts are where I share paintings and drawings I like. To see more Friday Favorites, click here.

Friday Favorite

Two Crabs by Vincent Van Gogh

This is a fun piece by Van Gogh that I’ve had as my desktop background for awhile now. I love how he creates contrast with color compliments. Last semester we talked a little about how he paints subjects in pairs or opposites such as two cut sunflowers (another favorite) or these shoes.

How about you? Do you have a favorite Van Gogh you’d like to share?

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Friday Favorite posts are where I share paintings I like in an effort to identify what excites me and to establish a record of said excitement. To see more Friday Favorites, click here.

Friday Favorite

Midlife Crisis by Eileen Sorg

Last summer Jeff and I were wandering around downtown Poulsbo and we popped into an art gallery store on Front Street where I encountered Eileen Sorg’s prints and greeting cards. Immediately I was drawn to her whimsical style and sense of humor. I love the witty scenes she sets up with mischievous critters. According to her website she uses mostly color pencil along with “ink, pastel and watercolor applied for added depth.”

To see more of her work visit her website or check out her blog.

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Friday Favorite posts are where I share art (mostly paintings and drawings) that inspires me. To see more Friday Favorites, click here.

Friday Favorite

Bulb Bits by Carol Marine

Thank you everyone for stopping by and commenting on Friday Favorites. In last week’s post on Carol Marine’s Canyon Light, Paula mentioned Carol’s appreciation for light and reflection of light which is an aspect of her work that I too admire. Painting glass on a light surface is challenging and Carol does a masterful job. Using a more neutral color scheme allows those reflected lights to pop adding variety and richness to the whole piece.

In her FAQ on her blog, she mentions that it has taken her 20 years to get to the point where she can paint one small painting in 1 to 3 hours. That’s both comforting and daunting at the same time. For now, it’s motivating me to finish this post and get back to drawing.

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Friday Favorite posts are where I share art (mostly paintings and drawings) that inspires me. To see more Friday Favorites, click here.

 

Friday Favorite

Canyon Light by Carol Marine

Last semester I heard about Carol Marine through a classmate and fell in love with her work immediately.

She has a keen eye for shifts in value and temperature. I love her thick and bold application of paint. Her work contains a beautiful balance between representation and abstraction.

Carol Marine is one among many “daily painters” and her work is featured on Daily Paintworks. The idea of starting and finishing a painting a day appeals to me and is the direction I want to go with my own work.

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Friday Favorite posts are where I share art that inspires me. To see more Friday Favorites, click here.

Friday Favorite

Still Life Revolving by Remedios Varo

Remedios Varo was a Spanish-Mexican surrealist. I believe this is the last painting she completed before she passed away in 1963.

I like the contrast between the lines that divide the background space versus the circles and sphere shapes we see from the table, plates and fruit in the center. The space is both fragmented and whole. The fruit and plates revolve around the candle like planets orbiting the sun. Though this is not a realistic scene, it is presented in a realistic and convincing way which is something I’d like to see in my own work someday.

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Friday Favorite posts are where I share art that inspires me. To see more Friday Favorites, click here.

Friday Favorite

Autumn Trees – The Maple by Georgia O’Keeffe

This is part of the Modern Nature exhibition at the De Young Museum and is one of O’Keeffe’s many Lake George paintings. The time she spent at Lake George and the work she did there is often seen as separate from her more famous desert landscapes and close up flower paintings. However, in this fantastic lecture by Erin Coe, chief curator of the Hyde Collection, Coe suggests that O’Keeffe’s time at Lake George isn’t a separate period, but rather a place that O’Keeffe returns to throughout her lifetime and whose influence can bee seen throughout her career.

According to Coe, Lake George is where O’Keeffe created her first botanicals and it’s where she “found her balance between abstraction and nature.” It’s the place where the O’Keeffe we know today was formed.

Coe notes that trees are one of the most underrated subjects in O’Keeffe’s body of work even though they are the most enduring of all her subjects. With over 31 canvases of trees O’Keeffe repeatedly returns to this subject over the course of seven decades.

O’Keeffe is quoted as saying, “If only people were trees, I might like them better.”

On a personal level, I’m drawn to O’Keeffe’s color selection and the contrast she achieves through her use of tertiary colors offset by grayer tones. There’s a feeling of both unity through color harmony and fragmentation through her division of the surface.

Though this lecture is an hour long, it’s absolutely worth listening to if you are an admirer of O’Keeffe:

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Friday Favorite posts are where I share works of art that I admire. To see more Friday Favorites, click here.

Friday Favorite

The Chestnut Grey by Georgia O’Keeffe

A little rushed today. It’s our 6 year wedding anniversary and so I’m trying to get enough work done on assignments to take some time off. Plus, I’m having internet connection problems again. O’Keeffe is a fascinating individual and there’s so much more about her I want to post, so I’ll have to write more about her in the coming weeks.

I saw her work featured at de Young Museum online and decided to post this one today for sentimental reasons. The shape and character of the chestnut tree remind me of where Jeff and I said our vows. We said them in private before the wedding underneath a similar tree overlooking the Puget Sound. The close up view of the tree overlooking a vista of abstracted hills/mountains/peaks reminds me of home.

What I love about O’Keeffe is that although she is simplifying forms, her work is not simple. I mentioned last week that I love how she combines realist and abstract elements. This is a great example of what I mean. There is a hierarchy of abstraction and detail with the hills in the background being the most abstract and the tree in front, the focal point, containing the most detail.

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Friday Favorite posts are where I share works of art that I admire. To see more Friday Favorites, click here.